Category Archives: Seminar

Seminar: Arithmetic Dynamics and Sarkovskii’s Theorem

Tuesday, November 6, 2012. Colloquium / Pizza Pi.
Prof. Ben Weiss, Bates College
“Arithmetic Dynamics and Sarkovskii’s Theorem”
421 Neville Hall. Pizza at 12:15, lecture from 12:30-1:20pm.

Given a function f(x), and a number A, what does the orbit {A, f(A), f(f(A)), f(f(f(A))), ….} look like? Can it be finite? If so how big can it be? These questions are part of dynamics, which studies functions by analyzing their orbits. The study of orbits has very wide applications to number theory, ergodic theory, and is a beautiful subject in its own right. We’ll discuss how dynamics of polynomials over the integers and rational numbers can tell us about units and arithmetical properties of these sets. Then we’ll discuss Sarkovskii’s Theorem, which classifies possible orbit sizes of continuous functions over the real numbers, and time permitting will discuss related open problems. This talk will be accessible to all.

October Will Be a Busy Month at the Bangor Foreign Policy Forum

At this time there are 4 events that the Bangor Foreign Policy Forum is sponsoring in the month of October. Three of them are in conjunction with other groups. There is also a SPIA event that will be of great interest to many members of the Forum. This e-mail will quickly summarize the events. You will receive additional e-mail with posters and other information about these events. You can always get details at BangorForum.us.

Quick Summary

October 12, 7:30 AM, Bangor Public Library, US Global Leadership Coalition
October 15, 7:30 AM, Bangor Public Library, China’s Military Expansionism
October 15, 4:00 PM, UMaine, 107 DPC, China’s Other Demographic Challenge
October 17, 5:00 PM, UMaine, Buchanan Alumni, SPIA, US Pakistan Relations
October 30, 7:00 PM, UMaine, 100 DPC, Furious Election of 1800

More details below. All events are free and open to the public. The October 12 event requires a no-cost pre-registration (see below).

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OCTOBER 12, 2012, FRIDAY, 7:30 AM BANGOR PUBLIC LIBRARY

AMERICA’S ROLE IN THE WORLD
George Ingram, Chairman Emeritus
Meghan Simonds, Deputy Government Relations Director
US Global Leadership Coalition

Please join us for breakfast and a roundtable discussion on U.S. global engagement and its impact on Maines future.

USGLC is catering a full breakfast at this meeting, so if you want to go you will need to register at the following website

http://action.usglc.org/site/Survey?ACTION_REQUIRED=URI_ACTION_USER_REQUESTS&SURVEY_ID=4860

We expect a very large turnout for this event so if you don’t register you will not be able to attend.

Note about the USGLC and the Speakers

The USGLC works in our nations capital and across the country to educate and inspire support from the American public and policymakers on the importance of Americas civilian-led tools of diplomacy and development. By advocating for increases in the International Affairs Budget, the USGLC is working to make the smart power tools of diplomacy and development a keystone of Americas engagement with the world.

Its advisory councils include people like Colin Powell, Madeline Albright, and Henry Kissenger. You can learn a lot more about them from their webstie: usglc.com

Biographies of the Speakers

George M. Ingram’s professional career working in the Congress, the Executive Branch, and the non-profit sector has focused on international economic and development policy.

Currently he serves as chair emeritus and senior adviser for the U.S. Global Leadership Coalition (USGLC), a network of more than 400 companies and NGOs that work on behalf of greater resources for and more effective use of US policies and programs of U.S. engagement in international affairs.

He also serves as co-chair of the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network, an alliance of development organizations, think tanks, and academics that advocate for modernizing US foreign assistance programs and structures.

From 1973 to 1995 Mr. Ingram was a senior staff member of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, responsible for international economic and development issues. His work included directing a year-long study of U.S. foreign assistance programs and drafting a full rewrite of the Foreign Assistance Act (passed the House but not the Senate) and statutes authorizing assistance to Eastern & Central Europe (SEED Act) and to the Former Soviet Union (FREEDOM Support Act).

Mr. Ingram served from 1995 to1998 as Vice President of Citizens Democracy Corps, an NGO supporting business development in the Former Soviet Union and Eastern and Central Europe. From 1998 to 2000, he was Principal Deputy Assistant Administrator of the Agency for International Development with primary responsibility for U.S. assistance programs in the Former Soviet Union.

From 2001-2011 he worked at AED. In his initial role there, 2001-2004, he was founding director of the Basic Education Coalition, a consortium of development organizations that advocates for greater priority for basic education in development programs. From 2004-2009 he was founding director of the Education Policy and Data Center, a research organization that focuses on improving the availability and use of data and policy analysis for education in developing countries. He then served as Senior Vice President for Public Policy and subsequently as interim President and CEO.

He serves on the boards of the Eurasia Foundation, the Executive Council on Diplomacy, and the Dockery Farm Foundation.

Mr. Ingram holds a bachelors degree from the University of North Carolina, a masters degree from Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (first year in Bologna, Italy), and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. He served as an adjunct professor at Georgetown University 1998-2000.

George was born in Knoxville and attended the Webb School in Belle Buckle.

Ms. Meghan Simonds joined the U.S. Global Leadership Coalition (USGLC) as Deputy Director of Government Relations in June 2009. Prior to that, she worked for Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) for four years in both her Bangor and Washington, D.C. offices. Meghan served as Senator Collins Legislative Assistant for foreign affairs, transportation and housing issues as well as the Senators Legislative Correspondent for foreign affairs, defense, and veterans affairs issues. Meghan graduated summa cum laude with high honors with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the University of Maine in Orono. At UMaine, Meghan was a member of the prestigious All Maine Women Honor Society and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. A Bangor native, Meghan now resides in Alexandria, VA.

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OCTOBER 15, 2012, MONDAY, 7:30 AM BANGOR PUBLIC LIBRARY

A QUEST FOR SECURITY OR INVINCIBILITY?
THE QUESTION OF MOTIVE IN CHINA’S
MILITARY EXPANSIONISM
Prof Don Wyatt
Middlebury College

Abstract: While emphasizing the peacefulness of her rise, the Peoples Republic of China will likely continue to allocate the same double-digit percentage increases to her military budget as made over the past ten years. Indeed, so committed has Chinas political leadership been to military expansion that the country will emerge within the next two decades as the worlds largest defense spender. Yet, Chinas motives for such military assertiveness have been as veiled as its aspirations have been transparent. In this talk, the plausible intentions behind Chinas military buildup will be enumerated and explored in light of several comparable developments in the past.

Biography of the Speaker

DON J. WYATT is John M. McCardell, Jr. Distinguished Professor in the Department of History at Middlebury College. Born in Illinois in 1953, he graduated from Beloit College in Wisconsin, as a Phi Beta Kappa inductee with a bachelors degree in Religious Studies, in 1975. He entered Harvard Universitys Regional Studies-East Asia program in 1976, where he obtained the masters degree in 1978, and continued thereafter in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, from which he received the doctoral degree in 1984.

Wyatt arrived at Middlebury College in 1986, whereby teaching courses ranging from early and modern Chinese and East Asian history to non-Western philosophy and the philosophy of historyhe has contributed from the first not only to the curriculum of History but also to that of the Department of Philosophy. His scholarly production includes works on the Chinese philosophical traditions of all premodern periods, with specialization in the several centuries of the Chinese middle imperial period generally and the Song dynasty (CE 960-1279), which is often thought to commence Chinas early modern era, in particular. His established interests include the history of traditional and immediate post-traditional Chinese intellectualism, and especially that of the development of Confucianism and Neo-Confucianism.

He has also produced works on customary Chinese ideas about war and warfare and on the historical and political dimensions of the early construction of Chinese cultural identity. His research has been supported by two generous residencies at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, in 2004 and 2010. His most recent book is The Blacks of Premodern China (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010). He is presently at work on projects as diverse as a study of the history of Chinese ethnic identity formation as a function of color consciousness; a contribution to the forthcoming volume The Image of the Black in African and Asian Art, edited by David Bindman, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Suzanne Blier; and various other unrelated scholarly pursuits.

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OCTOBER 15, 2012, MONDAY, 4:00 PM, UNIVERSITY OF MAINE, 107 DPC
In Collaboration with UMaine’s Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa

CHINA’S OTHER DEMOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE
Prof Don Wyatt
Middlebury College

The success of the Peoples Republic of China at controlling population size has attracted world attention in equal parts commendation and scorn. The most salient element of this strategy is of course the one-child family policy. However, little known to us in the West is that many in China are exempted from this policy. Among these exempted constituencies are the 55 non-Han minority groups, who in aggregate comprise less than a tenth of the overall population. What are the political and cultural ramifications of having an entirealbeit smallsegment of society freed from the consequential constraints to which a substantially larger majority must conform?

Biography of the Speaker

DON J. WYATT is John M. McCardell, Jr. Distinguished Professor in the Department of History at Middlebury College. Born in Illinois in 1953, he graduated from Beloit College in Wisconsin, as a Phi Beta Kappa inductee with a bachelors degree in Religious Studies, in 1975. He entered Harvard Universitys Regional Studies-East Asia program in 1976, where he obtained the masters degree in 1978, and continued thereafter in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, from which he received the doctoral degree in 1984.

Wyatt arrived at Middlebury College in 1986, whereby teaching courses ranging from early and modern Chinese and East Asian history to non-Western philosophy and the philosophy of historyhe has contributed from the first not only to the curriculum of History but also to that of the Department of Philosophy. His scholarly production includes works on the Chinese philosophical traditions of all premodern periods, with specialization in the several centuries of the Chinese middle imperial period generally and the Song dynasty (CE 960-1279), which is often thought to commence Chinas early modern era, in particular. His established interests include the history of traditional and immediate post-traditional Chinese intellectualism, and especially that of the development of Confucianism and Neo-Confucianism.

He has also produced works on customary Chinese ideas about war and warfare and on the historical and political dimensions of the early construction of Chinese cultural identity. His research has been supported by two generous residencies at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, in 2004 and 2010. His most recent book is The Blacks of Premodern China (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010). He is presently at work on projects as diverse as a study of the history of Chinese ethnic identity formation as a function of color consciousness; a contribution to the forthcoming volume The Image of the Black in African and Asian Art, edited by David Bindman, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Suzanne Blier; and various other unrelated scholarly pursuits.

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OCTOBER 17, 2012 WEDNESDAY, 5:00 PM. UMAINE BUCHANAN ALUMNI CENTER

SCHOOL OF POLICY AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS SEMINAR

US-PAKISTAN RELATIONS

Bruce Riedel

Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy
Saban Center for Middle East Policy
Brookings Institute

Bruce Riedel joined Brookings in 2006 after 30 years service at the Central Intelligence Agency including postings overseas in the Middle East and Europe. Riedel was a senior advisor on South Asia and the Middle East to the last four presidents of the United States in the staff of the National Security Council at the White House.

He was a negotiator at the Camp David, Shepherdstown and Wye River Israeli-Arab summits and organized President Clintons trip to India in 2000. In January 2009, President Barack Obama asked him to chair a review of American policy towards Afghanistan and Pakistan, the results of which the president announced in a speech on March 27, 2009.

In 2011, he served as an expert advisor to the prosecution of al Qaeda terrorist Omar Farooq Abdulmutallab in Detroit. In December 2011, Prime Minister David Cameron asked him to advise the United Kingdoms National Security Council on Pakistan. Riedel is the author of The Deadly Embrace: Pakistan, America and the Future of the global Jihad (2011 hardcover and 2012 paperback) and The Search for al Qaeda: Its Leadership, Ideology and Future (2008 hardcover and 2010 paperback). He is a contributor to Which Path to Persia: Options for a New American Strategy Toward Iran (2009) and The Arab Awakening: America and the Transformation of the Middle East (2011).

For more details look at:
http://www.brookings.edu/events/2011/01/18-pakistan-america#ref-id=0118_pakistan_america_riedel1

and

http://www.brookings.edu/experts/riedelb

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OCTOBER 30, 2012 TUESDAY 7:00 PM UMAINE 100 DPC

In Collaboration with the Camden Conference

ADAMS v. JEFFERSON:
the Furious Election of 1800  100 DAYS in 100 MINUTES

Mac Deford and Tom DeMarco will return with their intriguing history road show in anticipation of the 2013 Camden Conference: The Middle East: What Next? This years topic includes the Arab Spring, so Mac and Tom have put together a 100 minute presentation on a key event from our own US springtime and it is scheduled for the week before our upcoming furious election.

If you think US elections have gone downhill since the founders time, think again. The 1800 election had it all: slander, libel, name-calling, tinkering, bribes, and apocalyptic predictions for what would happen if the other guy should win.

George Markowsky, Professor and Associate Director
School of Computing and Information Science CS Graduate Coordinator
339 Boardman Hall
University of Maine
Orono, ME 04469-5711
DrGM.us – blog and website
Subscribe for all announcements.
+1-207-581-3940 Phone

Microsoft Presentations at the University of Maine

Edwin Guarin (edwin.guarin@microsoft.com), Senior Academic Developer Evangelist for Microsoft in New Englad, will be spending this Friday (September 28) afternoon at UMaine offering a variety of presentations. All presentations will be in 120 Neville Hall unless we need to move to a larger room, in which case the room change will be posted on the door of 120. Here is the schedule of events:

1 PM-2PM Faculty Workshop on Microsoft Resources for the Classroom
Describing pre-built curriculum materials.

2PM-3PM Imagine Cup Workshop
See below for more details and also www.imaginecup.com.

3PM-4PM Mini-workshop on Building a Windows 8 Game or App
This talk will describe all the different options available for building games. Edwin can also offer free
developer accounts so you can publish in the windows store at no cost. ($99 Value)

4PM-6PM Windows 8 Install Fest
This session will offer an overview of Windows 8 and help with installing it on your system.

For more information about Edwin Guarin see:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/edvangelist/

and

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xa87Cmntm08

School of Computing & Information Science Seminar: Cases of Spatial, Spatio-temporal and Temporal-spatial Analysis

2:10-3 PM, Wednesday September 5, 2012 Room 336, Boardman Hall

Cases of Spatial, Spatio-temporal and Temporal-spatial Analysis

Presenter: Dr. Sytze de Bruin, University of Wageningen, the Netherlands

Abstract:
Including the temporal dimension in spatial analysis often considerably affects computational complexity and may render some problems virtually infeasible on regular hardware and software configurations. In this presentation I present three recent research projects that relate to modelling states in space, states in space-time and rates in space.

The first example concerns a spatial optimisation problem producing tracks for auto-steering of agricultural machinery. The project has resulted in a semi-operational web service providing near real-time results to a group of innovative farmers.

The second is about representation of a dynamic spatial field (toxic plume) using optimally located mobile sensors. The objective function involves the expected accumulated misclassification costs, which are data dependent and hence change over time.

The third case concerns analysis of spatial relationships between climatologies and
changes in global vegetation activity within the context of a project on land degradation assessment. This problem was computationally very demanding because of the size of the global data set (remote sensing data).

In the end, all three cases deal with changing states of the world but they do so using different modelling decisions which depend on dynamics, needs and possibilities. Fully integrated spatio-temporal analysis calls for efficient algorithms and adequate computational power.

 

Seminar: Gregory Chaitin at the University of Maine February 25, 2013

Room and time to be determined.

Programming without a Programmer

Gregory Chaitin

Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

Abstract
Darwin’s theory of evolution has been described as design without a designer. Instead we study programming without a programmer, that is, the evolution of randomly mutating software. In other words, we propose a toy model of evolution that can be studied mathematically: the new field of metabiology, which deals with randomly evolving artificial software (computer programs) instead of randomly evolving natural software (DNA).

Bio
Gregory Chaitin is well known for his work on metamathematics and for the celebrated Ω number, which shows that God plays dice in pure mathematics. He has published many books on such topics, including Meta Math! The Quest for Omega. His latest book, Proving Darwin: Making Biology Mathematical, attempts to create a mathematical theory of evolution and biological creativity.
He is a professor at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and an honorary professor at the University of Buenos Aires, and has honorary doctorates from the University of Cordoba in Argentina and the University of Maine in the United States. He is also a member of the Académie Internationale de Philosophie des Sciences (Brussels) and the Leibniz-Sozietät der Wissenschaften (Berlin).